Dog Washing with Dr. Bronner’s Soap (Video)

Tucker totally steals the show here, but before you get enamored with him, let’s talk about dog washing in general.

The simplicity that makes Dr. Bronner’s Pure-Castile Soap great for our bodies, also makes it great for dogs.  You’ve got that blend of saponified plant-based oils – coconut, olive, palm, jojoba, and hemp – which is exceedingly nourishing as it cleans thoroughly.  And then you’ve got all the benefits of the various essential oils.  No junk.  No fillers.  No irritants or cloying artificial fragrances.  Plus, true soaps kill fleas and other insects.  It won’t give long term protection, but it does clean them up beautifully.

In the video, I mention that I don’t predilute the soap.  Tucker’s fur is so thick and holds so much water that once the soap hits it, it’s going to get diluted on the spot.  However, you can certainly predilute it if it works better for your pooch.  Cut it in half or more with water, wet your dog, and lather away.

Tucksie, Chucks/Chuckers, Captain Peanut Butter, Tuckermort, Darth Tucker.  His nicknames capture altogether his essence: a sweet, bumbling, uncomplicated, nose-less, loud breathing pup.  And that’s why we love him!

18 thoughts on “Dog Washing with Dr. Bronner’s Soap (Video)

  1. Great video and lovely gardens. I have been using it on my dog for years. I love how well it lathers and how easily it rinses out of his coat, and talk about shiny coats. Great product, we love it and use it in our home for our own body wash and shampoo, and absolutely love this product. My fave is the citrus.

    • So glad to hear it! Thank you for your kind words. For full disclosure, that’s not my garden, but isn’t it gorgeous? You can tell how thrilled Tucker is with the grass.

  2. Right now I am using Dr Harveys Herbal Protection Shampoo, which is also COMPLETELY non-toxic.
    When the bottle is empty I plan on saving the bottle and making my own version of Dr Harveys Herbal Protection Shampoo using Dr Bronners Lavender Liquid Castile Soap, to which I will add the flea/tick repelling essential oils.

  3. Sweet, sweet Tucker—he’s got a cute little manatee look going on! So glad he’s doing well! I gave up on “dog soaps” long ago and just use my Dr. B’s without any issues. No more itching, irritation, or chemically-smelling dogs. Simple and better….that’s the way we roll around here.

    • I’m with you, Lynn! The simplest is way is usually the best!

  4. Wish I would have known about Dr. Bronner’s soaps when we had our two black labs. Will keep it in mind if we decide to get another lab. For now, I will share the success with my friends with dogs.

  5. Is there any concern with getting it in their eyes? I still use “no more tears” baby shampoo because I worry about eye irritation. I’ve gone “Full Bronner” for my own cleaning rituals, would be happy to switch my pups too!

    • Hi Johnny – Soap would irritate dogs’ eyes just as it would ours. I just am careful to wash well away from them and make sure the water sprays or falls back away from the eyes.

  6. Tucker is awesomely cute. How do you keep his teeth so clean?
    Rescue dogs forever!

    • Hi Michelina – On Tucker’s behalf, thank you! I can’t take responsibility for his teeth. Other than feeding him dry kibble, which I hear helps, I don’t do anything for his teeth. He’s not a chewer, so he’s never been interested in those dental chews. I bought him a toothbrush once with the best of intentions, but I never used it.

    • Hi Elly – Yes, you can! We recommend using our unscented Baby Mild Castile on cats. As they are more sensitive to essential oils than dogs, you will want to avoid them with your cat, and our unscented has none.

  7. I just got the tea tree soap and was very shocked to see “wash your dog” on the list of uses because tea tree is extremely toxic for dogs. :/

    • Hi Jessica – I always appreciate a fellow label reader! At too high a concentration, tea tree oil would very well make a dog ill. In our soaps, the tea tree essential oil is at a low concentration of 2% tea tree oil. That, combined with the fact that the soap further diluted during the wash and then rinsed off, leaves a very small window of time for absorption, and is no danger. Also, dogs also do not clean themselves as arduously as cats, so even if there were some residue from the tea tree oil, they would be unlikely to ingest it. And of course soap should always be kept away from a dog’s face during bathing. If you’re not comfortable using the Tea Tree Castile soap on your dog, the Peppermint, Eucalyptus or even Unscented all work equally well on dogs.

  8. I have a 13 yr old shitzu/poodle mix that weighs 15 lbs. She is going thru a pancreatic flare up and pretty sick. We just found fleas on her for the first time in her life. Is the 18-1 Hemp lavendar safe for her right now? I’m not putting any toxic chemicals in or on her ever again. She has been fed a healthy home cooked diet with probiotics and 2 other supplements for the past 2 years.
    These fleas got to go!

    • Hi Julie – Poor pup! Yes, the Lavender Castile soap is safe for bathing her. It will kill the fleas it comes into contact with while wet, but once it dries it has no effect. Also, since it doesn’t kill the eggs, you’ll want to bathe her more frequently to stay ahead of the fleas. Be sure to also wash her bed/bedding frequently. You can do this with the Castile soap – use 1/3 cup in a top loading washer and add 1/2 cup vinegar to the rinse cycle (halve these measurements for an HE washer).

  9. Thank you, I’ve been using this for years I’m going to give my Lulu a bath today, I’ll give it a try!! Save some money as well. I have the peppermint straight out of the bottle right???? Thanks again.

    • Hi Deborah – Using it straight depends on weight and thickness of your furry friend’s coat. Tucker’s coat is very thick and holds so much water that the soap is instantly diluted. If your dog’s coat is thin, or if you’re not sure, dilute it first. You can add in more soap if needed.

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