Category
Body

Dog Washing with Dr. Bronner’s Soap

Tucker totally steals the show here, but before you get enamored with him, let’s talk about dog washing in general.

The simplicity that makes Dr. Bronner’s Pure-Castile Soap great for our bodies, also makes it great for dogs. You’ve got that blend of saponified plant-based oils—coconut, olive, palm, jojoba, and hemp seed—which is exceedingly nourishing as it cleans thoroughly. And then you’ve got all the benefits of the various essential oils. No junk. No fillers. No irritants or cloying artificial fragrances. Plus, true soaps like Castile Soap kill fleas and other insects. It won’t give long-term protection, but it does clean them up beautifully.

In the video, I mention that I don’t predilute the soap. Tucker’s fur is so thick and holds so much water that once the soap hits it, it’s going to get diluted on the spot. However, you can certainly predilute it if it works better for your pooch. Cut it in half or more with water, wet your dog, and lather away.

Tucksie, Chucks/Chuckers, Captain Peanut Butter, Tuckermort, Darth Tucker. His nicknames capture altogether his essence: a sweet, bumbling, uncomplicated, nose-less, loud-breathing pup. And that’s why we love him!

Essential oils and pets

Dr. Bronner’s products are scented only with essential oils, and because of this, I frequently get asked about the impact of essential oils on dogs and other pets. I am glad to hear that people are being mindful of essential oils, because when they’re undiluted, essential oils can be quite potent—which of course is why they’re utilized for various forms of relief. But as with all therapies, the dose makes the poison—or the cure.  

With Dr. Bronner’s Castile soap, the concentration of essential oils is less than 2%. This then gets further diluted by water either in predilutions or during the use. Lastly, soap is a rinse-off product, which means that there is not a long exposure as you would find with a lotion or other leave-in product. Altogether, the low initial concentration, the further dilution, plus the rinse-off mean that there is no concern of problematics level of exposure and you and your pup can enjoy the aromatherapy of the essential oils as you wash.  

Cats are the exception. Because cats are such assiduous self-bathers—I have one beside me doing just that as I write—plus cats lack certain liver enzymes that can break down essential oils, in case there is any accidental unrinsed soap left on the fur, it is recommended to use the Unscented Pure-Castile soap if you’re going to wash your cat.   

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Valerie says:

I like the lavender and peppermint too. I love the products thank you.

Emilie says:

My understanding is that dogs need a shampoo specially formulated for their skin, pH, etc. What do vets say about using Dr. Bronner’s on dogs?

Lisa Bronner says:

Hi Emilie- Dog skin is generally found to be alkaline, as opposed to human skin which has an acidic pH. Castile Soap is also alkaline. However, despite the fact that both dog skin and Castile Soap are mildly alkaline, pH is not the foremost consideration in which soap or shampoo to use on your dog. What is more important is the aggressiveness of the surfactant (or cleaning agent). A surfactant can have the exact same pH as a dog’s skin, yet be far too aggressive and cause irritation by stripping the skin of needed oils. Their skin is not as impacted by pH as by the aggressiveness of the cleaning agent. (This is all true of people skin as well, which you can read more about in my article on the issue: https://www.lisabronner.com/skin-health-ph-and-dr-bronners-soap/.) All that to say, the surfactants in the Castile Soap – which are saponified olive/coconut/palm oils – are mild, non-aggressive cleansers that gently remove dirt and grime without stripping the skin of its needed oils.

Robin says:

I love the wonderful Bronner soaps and the wonderful Bronner family!!!Shalom!!!🥰

Angus says:

I need to tell you to advise people to dilute soap between 8:1 to 20:1 for dogs. This is essential because the soap added to a dogs coat, even Pre wetted can cause a burn and rash of their skin and strip all of the oils on their skin. I use Bronners on my dog but always dilute as aforementioned. My friends and I all agree.

Lisa Bronner says:

Hi Angus- I’m sorry to hear of your pup’s experience with our soaps! It’s great to hear that you’ve found a solution in pre-diluting the soap. For dogs (and people!) with sensitive skin, we recommend one of mild scents such as Rose, Almond, or Unscented Castile Soap. The latter is particularly mild and gentle.

ABOUT / CONTACT

Lisa Bronner

Green means life. “Going Green” is living in such a way to promote vitality and vibrancy in every sphere of life. Grab an idea to make your days healthier, simpler, and more beautiful at their core.