How to Make a Castile Soap Household Cleaner Spray

Making a castile soap spray for general house cleaning couldn’t be easier. Please remember to label your spray bottles, so you don’t get them mixed up! Once you get fully established with homemade cleaners, you’ll have several spray bottle solutions in your cupboard.

31 thoughts on “How to Make a Castile Soap Household Cleaner Spray

  1. Love the header photo and video…:). Excellent information, thank you!

  2. You have such helpful information. Thanks so much for having this blog and sharing all the uses of your great soap! I’m really loving it.

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  4. Which Dr. Bronner Soap did you use?
    What is the ratio, soap:water?

    Where do you find good spray bottles? Mine always seem to break.

    PS: April 2011 Dr. Bronner has a sale on their original soaps, so I’m stocking up.

    Thanks.

  5. How many ounces is the water bottle you used? I picked up on the 1/4 c Dr. B’s, but wasn’t sure of the ratio of Dr. B to water.

  6. @ DJ and Cameo – Any of the castile soaps will work, but I usually use the Tea Tree because it has added antibacterial capabilities. If that’s not on hand, though, I use anything. It’s 1/4 c. castile soap in a 1 quart spray bottle, filled the rest of the way with water. I bought my spray bottles at Home Depot, and I bought the pricier ones (around $3/bottle). I happened to be there when the supplier for the cheap ones was stocking the shelves, and he told me they were really flimsy and would break in a year. Once, I found a 6 pack of heavy duty spray bottles at Costco, but they haven’t been there the last times I’ve checked.

    Take care,
    Lisa

  7. Does this solution need to be rinsed? What surfaces can it be used on? Thank you!

  8. Hi Angela – If you get the right concentration – not too much, you can just wipe this off with a damp cloth. No extra rinsing needed. It is safe on most household surfaces, but you might notice a film on really shiny surfaces. It’s the hard water residue. Hope this helps! Lisa

  9. Thanks for the great video!

    I attempted to half your recipe, since 16 oz is half a quart. Filled up to the 16 oz mark with cold filtered water and about a tablespoon of Dr B’s Lavender 18-1. Added 10 drops of Lavender Essential Oil.

    Does this sound good for an all purpose house cleaner?

  10. @ Kenny – I was putting 1/4 c. of castile soap per quart of water for my all purpose cleaner. So if you’re only making 16 oz., use 2 Tbsp. of the castile soap. The lavender essential oil would be a wonderful scent to have.

    Happy cleaning!
    Lisa

  11. Will this solution work to clean inside of toilets? I tried looking for a post on toliets and couldn’t find one. I’m I just missing it?

    • @Tanya – I haven’t gotten to toilets yet. I’m still deciding on my best method. Here are a couple options: my first is a little time-consuming, but I think it works the best. Turn the water to the toilet off, then flush the toilet. This will drain the bowl. Spray down the inside of the bowl with the Castile soap spray with the added tea tree oil. Let that sit there for 10 minutes. Then scrub it with a toilet bowl brush, turn the water back on and flush. You can also do this with the Sal Suds spray if you prefer. You can also add some baking soda to your toilet bowl brush for some added scrubbing power. Also, if the bowl is particularly dirty, add the baking soda, and then spray with a vinegar solution. I realize all of this is rather time-consuming, so when I’ve streamlined the process, I’ll blog about it. I’d love to have any input on this!

      All the best,
      Lisa

  12. I add food coloring to my solutions so I can easily tell them apart. My castile spray is yellow, vinegar spray is green, and homemade Windex is blue (of course).

    I clean the toilet bowl with bleach (pour in 1 cup, wait 15 min, scrub and flush.) I also keep a spray bottle of dilute bleach for the cutting board, on the rare occasions when we prepare meat. I realize some people try to avoid bleach, but in my mind it is still the best option to clean those two items. (And if that’s all you’re doing with it, your exposure is still pretty minimal.)

  13. I just got my first bottle of castile soap. I have heard wonderful things about it and I am going to try it. I got the peppermint. Can you mix vinegar with the soap mix? I have heard that vinegar is good for disinfecting too.

    Baking soda, soap mix and vinegar may be a multi step process any which way. Baking soda and vinegar together get fizzy and I am sure if you mixed them too early, it may take out the fizzy too soon. I do think that if you can add soap mix with vinegar, you can cut this down to 2 steps at least and it is better then using harsh chemicals!

    • Hi Dawn – I hope I’ve responded to you in time before you’ve tried a vinegar/castile soap mix. They both are extremely useful in housecleaning, but they do not mix together. It is a very common misconception. However, you will get a white, chunky, oily mess if you try it. You can read more of my thoughts about that here in my post, “A word of caution about vinegar and castile soap”: http://lisa.drbronner.com/?p=292. Baking soda can work well with the castile soap, as an added scouring agent, but it will clog a sprayer, so you can’t make a solution of it. I keep baking soda in a shaker bottle (an old seasoning bottle) and sprinkle it on surfaces after I’ve sprayed them with my castile soap spray. If you scrub with this and wipe it off, you won’t really need the extra vinegar step afterwards.

      Please let me know if I can be of further help!

      All the best,
      Lisa

  14. Hi! Thank you for great cleaning tips! Can you write out what you say in the vid? Rain

  15. Hi Lisa, I have not yet tried this, but just read that citric acid works better for toliet bowls than vinegar. I have very hard water so my bowls stain very badly at times. I always use distilled water for cleaning supplies because of the hard water, which of course I always have anyway-haha.
    I am so excited to have found a reliable source for homemade cleaning supplies, thank you so much.
    Jenny

    • Hi Jenny – Glad to hear you’re on the same path! For the citric acid, will you be using a powder dissolved in water? Let me know how that works.

      All the best,
      Lisa

  16. I was wondering if anyone has used DB on granite surfaces? I am typically a fan of vinegar based, home made all purpose cleaners, but I was warned by the installers about using vinegar on granite as it would break down the seal. Does anyone use DB on granite? And, if so, are there DB castile products to shy away from? For instance, can I use the citrus on the granite? Thanks so much to you all.
    Amanda

  17. Hi Rain – Here’s the gist of the video: Get a high quality quart spray bottle, fill nearly to the top with water. Add 1/4 c. castile soap (any flavor). You can add about 20 drops of tea tree pure essential oil, if you’d like, for extra antibacterial action. Shake it up and start cleaning. The little trick is to put the water in first so that you don’t overflow with bubbles.

    Spray it on surfaces and wipe with a cloth – my recommendation is a microfiber cloth.

    Hi Amanda – I have granite countertops and the Sal Suds and CAstile soap sprays both work great. They are alkaline, so they don’t have that etching possibility as with the acidity of vinegar. I usually use the Sal Suds because it’s slightly more effective, but if I’m having an ant problem, I use the castile soap because it also repels them.

    All the best,
    Lisa

  18. Can you use this solution as a fabric spray on couches, bedding, curtains and such? When sanitizing toys, must you always wipe off with dry/wet cloth or can you leave it on?

  19. Hi Lisa – I’m going to make this soon as well as a hand soap and was wondering what the shelf life is for diluted castile soap?

  20. I do apologize for my delay in responding to these comments. I hope my answers are still helpful.

    RSmith – The castile soap is not a “leave-on” product like a sanitizing spray that would contain alcohol. The residue from the soap is not harmful, but because it is soap, it attracts and binds to dirt. Therefore, you would notice a quick build up on the surfaces you sprayed. If you spray it on and wipe it off with a damp cloth, this works well. Personally, I would go with the Dr. Bronner’s Sal Suds for cleaning upholstery and such. It is more effective and more clean rinsing.

    Melissa – The shelf life of the diluted soap depends on a variety of factors, but I’ve found that this particular spray solution does fine for several months. What I notice changes is the essential oils. I think that the solution is still an effective cleaner after that, though.

    Taryn – Yes, it would work great on granite countertops. I have granite in my kitchen and spraying with this and then wiping with a microfiber cloth makes them really shine.

    All the best,
    Lisa

  21. Hi Lisa! I have recently started using your castile soap for cleaning. What do you think about using distilled water for those that have harder water? That’s what I used.I was wondering if the all purpose spray is safe for cleaning wood? I would really love a list of what its safe to use on. Also, I did mix up some granite cleaner using it. I used 4 drops of the soap, 1/4c. 70% rubbing alcohol and the rest water in a 32 oz. spray. It works wonderful!

    Thanks,
    Amber

  22. Hi Lisa,
    I LOVE your blog!
    When I make my cleaner and add tea tree pure essential oil I notice that the oil does not keep mixed together with the rest, is there something to add so this won’t happen? Or I have to shake every time I use it?
    Thanks
    ~Esther

  23. Hi Esther – Thanks! Yes, it will separate and you’ll have to shake it from time to time.

    All the best,
    Lisa

  24. Is there a Dr. Bronner brand tea tree oil? If not, what brand did you use in the video? Thank you!

  25. We have handscraped hickory floors. What would you recommend to clean? Thanks
    Colleen

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